Honoring HIS Choices

 BLCF: header_lean_into_the_lord

Bloor Lansdowne Christian Fellowship – BLCF Church Message for Sunday:

Honoring HIS Choices’

© November 13, 2016 by Steve Mickelson

BLCF: Bulletin-November-13-2016

BLCF: Gods-covenants

Announcements and Call to Worship: Responsive Reading #641 (Christian Assurance – Romans 8); Prayer                 

Opening Hymn #317: Blessed Assurance, Jesus Is Mine; Choruses                   

Prayer and Tithing Hymn #572: Praise God from Whom All Blessings  

Scripture Verses:  2 Peter 1:1-14, Romans 8:31-39, John 3:16-18

genesis-28_15

Let us pray…

Welcome to BLCF Church’s Sunday Morning Praise and Worship Service. For today’s lesson, we will talk about three aspects of our relationship with the Lord which some Christians casually use interchangeably: covenants, promises and contracts relating to God.

To understand the differences between the terms let us briefly look at the definition of each term.

Covenant vs Promise

 BLCF: God's_promises_rainbow

Although some people consider a covenant and a promise as synonymous, it is a wrong assumption because there is a difference between a covenant and a promise. First, let us define the two words. A covenant can be defined as a formal agreement between two or more parties where they agree to do or not to do something. This word is mostly used in religious backgrounds as well. On the other hand, a promise is an assurance that one will do something or that something will happen. The main difference between a covenant and a promise is that while, in a covenant, both parties have clear obligations and        responsibilities, in a promise, this characteristic cannot be observed. Instead, in a promise, what we can observe is the active role undertaken by one party while the other remains passive. Through this article let us examine the differences between these two words, covenant and promise.

http://www.differencebetween.com/difference-between-covenant-and-vs-promise/

Difference between Covenant and Contract

BLCF: covenant-vs-contract

A covenant is defined as an agreement or written promise between two or more parties that constitutes a pledge to do or refrain from doing something. Thus, an agreement that requires the performance of some act is termed an “affirmative covenant” while an agreement that restricts or refrains a person from performing something is called a “negative covenant.” In other words, a covenant is a type of contract and falls within the purview of contracts in general. The person making the pledge or promise is called the covenantor while the person to whom such promise is made is known as the covenantee. In addition, covenants are also included in a contract, thereby forming part of the contract. In certain instances, it may constitute a particular condition in a contract.

In simple terms, a contract is an oral or written promise that is enforceable by law. It is defined in law as a voluntary agreement between two or more parties, who intend to create legal obligations, in which there is a promise to do or perform some work or service for a valuable consideration or benefit.

http://www.differencebetween.com/difference-between-covenant-and-vs-contract/

Scriptures describe two Covenants; one is described as Old and the other as New:

BLCF: Covenant-of-Grace-chart

The Old Covenant

 The content of the Law is spread among the books of ExodusLeviticus, and Numbers, and then reiterated and added to in Deuteronomy (Deuteronomy is Latinized Greek for “Second reading of the Law”). This includes:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Law_of_Moses

The New Covenant

The New Covenant is a biblical interpretation originally derived from a phrase in the Book of Jeremiah, in the Hebrew Bible. Generally, Christians believe that the New Covenant was instituted at the Last Supper as part of the Eucharist, which in the Gospel of John includes the New Commandment.

There are several Christian eschatologies that further define the New Covenant. For example, an inaugurated eschatology defines and describes the New Covenant as an ongoing relationship between Christian believers and God that will be in full fruition after the Second Coming of Christ; that is, it will not only be in full fruition in believing hearts, but in the future external world as well. The connection between the blood of Christ and the New Covenant is seen in most modern English translations of the New Testament[6] with the saying: “this cup that is poured out for you is the new covenant in my blood”.[7]

Christians believe that Jesus is the mediator of the New Covenant, and that the blood of Christ shed at his crucifixion is the required blood of the covenant. As with all covenants between God and man described in the Bible, the New Covenant is considered “a bond in blood sovereignly administered by God.”[8] It has been theorized that the New Covenant is the Law of Christ as spoken during his Sermon on the Mount.[9]

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Covenant_(religion)

Believers in the Resurrected Christ should focus on the God’s New Covenant. Let us recap the important points of the New Covenant terminology:

 The New Covenant

  • A covenant is defined asan agreement or written promise between two or more parties that constitutes a pledge to do or refrain from doing something.
  • Covenants are also included in a contract, thereby forming part of the contract. In certain instances, it may constitute a particular condition in a contract.
  • In a promise, what we can observe is the active role undertaken by one party while the other remains passive.
  • Christians believe that Jesus is the mediator of the New Covenant, and that the blood of Christ shed at his crucifixionis the required blood of the covenant. As with all covenants between God and man described in the Bible, the New Covenant is considered “a bond in blood sovereignly administered by God.

 Now that we understand the differences between

2 Peter 1:1-14 (ESV) Greeting

BLCF: 2_Peter

 Simeon[a] Peter, a servant[b] and apostle of Jesus Christ,

To those who have obtained a faith of equal standing with ours by the righteousness of our God and Savior Jesus Christ:

May grace and peace be multiplied to you in the knowledge of God and of Jesus our Lord.

Confirm Your Calling and Election

BLCF: 2 Peter-Promises

His divine power has granted to us all things that pertain to life and godliness, through the knowledge of him who called us to[c] his own glory and excellence,[d] by which he has granted to us his precious and very great promises, so that through them you may become partakers of the divine nature, having escaped from the corruption that is in the world because of sinful desire. For this very reason, make every effort to supplement your faith with virtue,[e] and virtue with knowledge, and knowledge with self-control, and self-control with steadfastness, and steadfastness with godliness, and godliness with brotherly affection, and brotherly affection with love. For if these qualities[f] are yours and are increasing, they keep you from being ineffective or unfruitful in the knowledge of our Lord Jesus Christ. For whoever lacks these qualities is so nearsighted that he is blind, having forgotten that he was cleansed from his former sins. 10 Therefore, brothers and sisters,[g] be all the more diligent to confirm your calling and election, for if you practice these qualities you will never fall. 11 For in this way there will be richly provided for you an entrance into the eternal kingdom of our Lord and Savior Jesus Christ.

12 Therefore I intend always to remind you of these qualities, though you know them and are established in the truth that you have. 13 I think it right, as long as I am in this body,[h] to stir you up by way of reminder,14 since I know that the putting off of my body will be soon, as our Lord Jesus Christ made clear to me.

Footnotes: a. 2 Peter 1:1 Some manuscripts Simon b. 2 Peter 1:1 For the contextual rendering of the Greek word doulos, see Preface c. 2 Peter 1:3 Or by e. 2 Peter 1:3 Or virtue f. 2 Peter 1:5 Or excellence; twice in this verse g. 2 Peter 1:8 Greek these things; also verses 91012 h. 2 Peter 1:10 Or brothers and sisters. In New Testament usage, depending on the context, the plural Greek word adelphoi (translated “brothers”) may refer either to brothers or to brothers and sisters i. 2 Peter 1:13 Greek tent; also verse 14

 Romans 8:31-39 (ESV) God’s Everlasting Love

BLCF: Romans-8_31-39

 31 What then shall we say to these things? If God is for us, who can be[a]against us? 32 He who did not spare his own Son but gave him up for us all, how will he not also with him graciously give us all things? 33 Who shall bring any charge against God’s elect? It is God who justifies. 34 Who is to condemn? Christ Jesus is the one who died—more than that, who was raised—who is at the right hand of God, who indeed is interceding for us.[b] 35 Who shall separate us from the love of Christ? Shall tribulation, or distress, or persecution, or famine, or nakedness, or danger, or sword? 36 As it is written,

“For your sake we are being killed all the day long;
we are regarded as sheep to be slaughtered.”

37 No, in all these things we are more than conquerors through him who loved us. 38 For I am sure that neither death nor life, nor angels nor rulers, nor things present nor things to come, nor powers, 39 nor height nor depth, nor anything else in all creation, will be able to separate us from the love of God in Christ Jesus our Lord.

Footnotes: a. Romans 8:31 Or who is b. Romans 8:34 Or Is it Christ Jesus who died… for us?

John 3:16-18 (ESV) For God So Loved the World

BLCF: John-3_16

 16 “For God so loved the world,[a] that he gave his only Son, that whoever believes in him should not perish but have eternal life. 17 For God did not send his Son into the world to condemn the world, but in order that the world might be saved through him. 18 Whoever believes in him is not condemned, but whoever does not believe is condemned already, because he has not believed in the name of the only Son of God.

If we view Christ who has called us to his glory and excellence and by accepting the Lord’s sacrifice on the cross, we enter a spiritual contract.

Elements of a Contract. The requisite elements that must be established to demonstrate the formation of a legally binding contract are (1) offer; (2) acceptance; (3) consideration (price); (4) mutuality of obligation; (5) competency and capacity; and, in certain circumstances, (6) a written instrument.

https://contracts.uslegal.com/elements-of-a-contract/

So, let us examine the elements of this contract, that as Christians we are bound:

  • Offer – God so loved the world, that he gave his only Son

 (2) Acceptance – Whoever believes in him should not perish but have eternal life

(3) Consideration – God did not send his Son into the world to condemn the world, but in order that the world might be saved through him

(4) Mutuality of obligation – Whoever believes in him is not condemned, (saved) but whoever does not believe is condemned already, because he has not believed in the name of the only Son of God

(5) Competency and capacity; and, in certain circumstances – Make every effort to supplement your faith with virtue, and virtue with knowledge,  and knowledge with self-control, and self-control with steadfastness, and steadfastness with godliness,  and godliness with brotherly affection, and brotherly affection with love

  (6) A written instrument – (written by the blood of Christ) As it is written, “For your sake we are being killed all the day long; we are regarded as sheep to be slaughtered.”

No, in all these things we are more than conquerors through him who loved us. For I am sure that neither death nor life, nor angels nor rulers, nor things present nor things to come, nor powers,  nor height nor depth, nor anything else in all creation, will be able to separate us from the love of God in Christ Jesus our Lord.

Let us pray…

Closing Hymn #225: Standing on the Promises

Benediction – (Psalm 121:7-8):

The Lord will keep you from all evil;
he will keep your life.
The Lord will keep
your going out and your coming in                                                                          
from this time forth and forevermore.

psalm-121_7-8

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Finding the Perfection of God’s Purpose by Way of Faith and Action

Bible Joshua Rahab River

Bloor Lansdowne Christian Fellowship – BLCF Church Message for Sunday:

‘Finding the Perfection of God’s Purpose by Way of Faith and Action’

© March 9 2014 by Steve Mickelson

BLCF: Bulletin March 9, 2014

 

BLCF:trusting_God's_will

 

Announcements and Call to Worship: Call to Worship: Responsive Reading #642

(Call to Consecration – Romans 12); Prayer

Opening Hymn #84: Come and Praise the Lord Our King (Tune of Michael Row the Boat Ashore); Choruses                                                                                                                                   

Scripture Verses: Joshua 6:2-20 and James 2:14-26

Joshua 6:2-20 (ESV)

BLCF:Joshua_Martin

And the Lord said to Joshua, “See, I have given Jericho into your hand, with its king and mighty men of valor. You shall march around the city, all the men of war going around the city once. Thus shall you do for six days. Seven priests shall bear seven trumpets of rams’ horns before the ark. On the seventh day you shall march around the city seven times, and the priests shall blow the trumpets. And when they make a long blast with the ram’s horn, when you hear the sound of the trumpet, then all the people shall shout with a great shout, and the wall of the city will fall down flat,[a] and the people shall go up, everyone straight before him.” So Joshua the son of Nun called the priests and said to them, “Take up the ark of the covenant and let seven priests bear seven trumpets of rams’ horns before the ark of the Lord.” And he said to the people, “Go forward. March around the city and let the armed men pass on before the ark of the Lord.”

BLCF:battle_of_Jericho

And just as Joshua had commanded the people, the seven priests bearing the seven trumpets of rams’ horns before the Lord went forward, blowing the trumpets, with the ark of the covenant of the Lord following them. The armed men were walking before the priests who were blowing the trumpets, and the rear guard was walking after the ark, while the trumpets blew continually. 10 But Joshua commanded the people, “You shall not shout or make your voice heard, neither shall any word go out of your mouth, until the day I tell you to shout. Then you shall shout.” 11 So he caused the ark of the Lord to circle the city, going about it once. And they came into the camp and spent the night in the camp.

12 Then Joshua rose early in the morning, and the priests took up the ark of the Lord. 13 And the seven priests bearing the seven trumpets of rams’ horns before the ark of the Lord walked on, and they blew the trumpets continually. And the armed men were walking before them, and the rear guard was walking after the ark of the Lord, while the trumpets blew continually. 14 And the second day they marched around the city once, and returned into the camp. So they did for six days.

JerichoWalls7Priests

15 On the seventh day they rose early, at the dawn of day, and marched around the city in the same manner seven times. It was only on that day that they marched around the city seven times. 16 And at the seventh time, when the priests had blown the trumpets, Joshua said to the people, “Shout, for the Lord has given you the city. 17 And the city and all that is within it shall be devoted to the Lord for destruction.[b] Only Rahab the prostitute and all who are with her in her house shall live, because she hid the messengers whom we sent. 18 But you, keep yourselves from the things devoted to destruction, lest when you have devoted them you take any of the devoted things and make the camp of Israel a thing for destruction and bring trouble upon it. 19 But all silver and gold, and every vessel of bronze and iron, are holy to the Lord; they shall go into the treasury of the Lord.” 20 So the people shouted, and the trumpets were blown. As soon as the people heard the sound of the trumpet, the people shouted a great shout, and the wall fell down flat, so that the people went up into the city, every man straight before him, and they captured the city.

Footnotes: a. Joshua 6:5 Hebrew under itself; also verse 20 b. Joshua 6:17 That is, set apart (devoted) as an offering to the Lord (for destruction); also verses 18, 21

 

BLCF: Women-of-Valor-Rahab          

                                                     

Let us pray…

 

A short while ago, Sophie and I watched a television broadcast of the 2010 of the Karate Kid movie.  This remake had some script changes from the earlier version of the movie starring Jadan Smith, as the student, and Jackie Chan playing the teacher.

BLCF: wax on, wax off

Instead of the teacher waxing a car, remember the “Wax on, wax off” routine of the original film, the Jack Chan character has the Jaden Smith, repeatedly, doing a routine of:   “throwing the jacket to the ground, then picking the jacket up, next hanging the jacket up on a peg mounted on a pole, and ending with taking the jacket off the peg to put on the jacket”.

Both routines, though different, show how repeating seemingly mundane routine actions, gave each respective student a muscle memory routine, that taught attention to detail, obedience to the teacher, self-discipline, focus and trust, while he learned a skill- set beyond actions.

BLCF: Jaden_Smith_Jackie_Chan_Karate_Kid

The first of today’s two Scripture verses could have us, initially, questioning: why did the Lord have Joshua, along with seven priests and all of his men, repeat the routine of marching around the city of Jericho seven times, on seven days. On each of the first six days, all were silent, save for the blowing of their horn trumpets as they marched. And on the seventh and final day, the routine was repeated again, not once but seven times and on the completion of the seventh and final circuit, those assembled would “shout for the Lord.” And after they shouted, the city walls of Jericho were destroyed.

The only people of Jericho to survive were those in the household of Rahab, a prostitute who gave shelter and safety to messengers that were sent by the Lord.

BLCF:Rahab

Some of you may recall a message that I shared here at BLCF a few years ago about the healing of Naaman, a Gentile, who was Commander of the army of the King of Syria. Naaman was afflicted with Leprosy, is described in the fifth chapter of 2 Kings. A servant girl who was captured from the people of Israel and served in commander’s household told the Commander’s wife that she believed that the God of Israel could heal Naaman of Leprosy.

BLCF: servant_speaks_to_Naaman's_Wife

Elisha, a prophet of Israel, refused to touch, anoint, touch or even speak to Naaman, instead sending a servant to deliver a letter, instructing the Syrian Commander to wash himself in the Jordan River seven times.

Initially, Naaman was infuriated that Elisha had refused an audience with him and that he was told to bathe in the Jordan River instead of a river in Syria, so he stormed away. But Naaman was convinced by his servants that Elisha was a  mighty prophet of God, reminding their master that he was promised to be healed, if he followed Elisha’s directions. Eventually, Naaman did follow the instructions and was completely healed of his affliction.

BLCF: 2Kings5

 

We see with both actions, one which destroyed Jericho and the other, being the healing of an affliction, are examples of how God rewards obedience and faith. It is interesting to note that Joshua and Naaman, each, were instructed to repeat an action seven times.  Fortunately, both Joshua and Naaman did not quit after completing only six repetitions, electing instead to faithfully follow their instructions to the end. In both accounts, we see how the repetition of seemingly insignificant actions such as marching in circles or bathing in a river, can have miraculous consequences when God is involved. And also interesting is how God’s Glory is revealed through the faith demonstrated by a servant girl and a prostitute. How marvelous that a leper, who does not have the birthright of the people of Israel, may receive God’s blessing for actions that demonstrate a faith and trust in the Lord!

But why were Joshua and Naaman instructed to repeat their action seven times? After all, would doing such action one time be enough to satisfy God? Is there any significance to seven repetitions asked of Naaman and Joshua? To understand the significance of the number 7 in the Holy Scriptures, let us look to an excerpt from biblestudy.org:

 

What does the word for 7 mean in Hebrew? (From: biblestudy.org)

BLCF: Seven in the Bible

But now turning to the number 7, we must first consider the meaning of the word.

In the Hebrew, 7 is shevah. It is from the root savah, to be full or satisfied, have enough of. Hence the meaning of the word “seven” is dominated by this root, for on the seventh day God rested from the work of Creation. It was full and complete, and good and perfect. Nothing could be added to it or taken from it without marring it. Hence the word Shavath, to cease, desist, rest, and Shabbath, Sabbath, or day of rest.

It is 7, therefore, that stamp with perfection and completeness that in connection with which it is used. Of time, it tells of the Sabbath, and marks off the week of seven days, which, artificial as it may seem to be, is universal and immemorial in its observance amongst all nations and in all times. It tells of that eternal Sabbath-keeping which remains for the people of God in all its everlasting perfection.

In the creative works of God, seven completes the colors of the spectrum and rainbow, and satisfies in music the notes of the scale. In each of these the eighth is only a repetition of the first.

Another meaning of the root Shavagh is to swear, or make an oath.

  God gave a seven-fold blessing to Abraham:          

                    Seven-fold blessing Abraham received from God

BLCF: God's Promises to Abraham

Abraham’s seven-fold blessing in Genesis 12:2, 3: –

“I will make of thee a great nation,
And I will bless thee,
And make thy name great;
And thou shalt be a blessing;
And I will bless them that bless thee,
And curse him that curseth thee:
And in thee shall all families of the earth be blessed.”

And aside from those accounts we have just read, courtesy of boblestudy.com,  we see the Psalmist describing the Lord’s words being pure as silver that has been refined in a furnace seven times. When God speaks, it is often not just words, but by His promises:

Psalm 12:6 (ESV)

BLCF: Covenant_through_Christ

The words of the Lord are pure words, like silver refined in a furnace on the ground, purified seven times.

While the ESV translation talks of the “words” of God, the CEV translates Psalm 12:6 it more powerfully as “promises” of God:

Psalm 12:6 (CEV)

Our Lord, you are true to your promises, and your word is like silver
heated seven times in a fiery furnace.[a]

Footnotes: a. 12.6 in a fiery furnace: The Hebrew text has “in a furnace to the ground,” which may describe part of a process for refining silver in Old Testament times

BLCF: God's_Promises_New_Covenant

God’s promises include His Covenant, which He made with Israel:

What was God’s 7 part Covenant with Israel?

God’s seven-fold covenant with Israel in Exodus 6:6-8. 7 times does the expression, “I will” occur in these few verses, stamping the whole with spiritual perfection. These are preceded by “I have” three times repeated (verses 4,5), giving the Divine basis on which the blessing was based.

I have established My covenant with them, etc.
I have also heard their groaning, etc.
I have remembered My covenant.

Then follows the seven-fold blessing: –

I will bring you out from Egypt.
I will rid you of their bondage.
I will redeem you.
I will take you to Me for a people.
I will be to you a God.
I will bring you in unto the land.
I will give it you.

BLCF: MiraclesofJesusChrist

 

And the number seven has relevance found in the seven miracles described in John’s gospel of the New Testament:

What are the 7 miracles written about in the gospel of John?

  • The      water turned into wine. (John 2:9)
  • Healing      of the nobleman’s son. (John 4:47)
  • Healing      of crippled man at the pool of Bethesda. (John 5:4-9)
  • The      feeding of 5,000 people from only five loaves of bread and two fishes.      (John 6:10)
  • Healing      of the man born blind. (John 9:1)
  • The      raising of Lazarus from the dead. (John 11:43)
  • The      catching of 153 fishes by some of the disciples. (John 21:6)

These formed the spiritual perfection of the “signs” that Jesus was the Christ.

BLCF:Jesus'_miracles

And then there are the seven miracles performed by Jesus on the SABBATH:

What were the 7 miracles Jesus performed on the SABBATH?

Seven miracles wrought by Christ on the Sabbath day: –

  1. 1.     The withered hand, Matthew 12:9.
  2. 2.     The unclean spirit, Mark 1:21.
  3. 3.     Peter’s wife’s mother, Mark 1:29.
  4. 4.     The woman, Luke 13:11.
  5. 5.     The man with dropsy, Luke 14:2.
  6. 6.     The impotent man, John 5:8,9.
  7. 7.     The man born blind, John 9:14.

http://www.biblestudy.org/bibleref/meaning-of-numbers-in-bible/7.html

But even though the Scriptures indicate that the number seven is significant, it is the combination of faith and action that is important. So in the accounts of Joshua and  Naaman, which is more important, the action or the faith? James indicates that both are important:

James 2:14-26 (ESV) Faith Without Works Is Dead

BLCF: faith and work together

14 What good is it, my brothers, if someone says he has faith but does not have works? Can that faith save him? 15 If a brother or sister is poorly clothed and lacking in daily food, 16 and one of you says to them, “Go in peace, be warmed and filled,” without giving them the things needed for the body, what good[a] is that? 17 So also faith by itself, if it does not have works, is dead.

BLCF: unbalanced

18 But someone will say, “You have faith and I have works.” Show me your faith apart from your works, and I will show you my faith by my works. 19 You believe that God is one; you do well. Even the demons believe—and shudder! 20 Do you want to be shown, you foolish person, that faith apart from works is useless? 21 Was not Abraham our father justified by works when he offered up his son Isaac on the altar? 22 You see that faith was active along with his works, and faith was completed by his works; 23 and the Scripture was fulfilled that says, “Abraham believed God, and it was counted to him as righteousness”—and he was called a friend of God. 24 You see that a person is justified by works and not by faith alone. 25 And in the same way was not also Rahab the prostitute justified by works when she received the messengers and sent them out by another way? 26 For as the body apart from the spirit is dead, so also faith apart from works is dead.

Footnotes: a. James 2:16 Or benefit

BLCF: balanced

We see that James not only acknowledges the faith of the prostitute Rahab in James 2:25, but her actions to protect the messengers, as well. We are told that neither faith nor works may exist alone. Together, we have the two working in harmony as a complete expression of our belief and trust in God, and to fulfill Scripture. That faith without action is dead and action without faith is dead. Both are important to God, and either alone is meaningless to Him.

It is through actions performed by faith in God that we receive steadfastness by way of the Holy Spirit, which like God’s number seven, is perfect and complete, lacking nothing:

BLCF: trials

James 1:2-4 (ESV) Testing of Your Faith

Count it all joy, my brothers,[a] when you meet trials of various kinds, for you know that the testing of your faith produces steadfastness. And let steadfastness have its full effect, that you may be perfect and complete, lacking in nothing.

Footnotes: a. James 1:2 Or brothers and sisters. The plural Greek word adelphoi (translated “brothers”) refers to siblings in a family. In New Testament usage, depending on the context, adelphoi may refer either to men or to both men and women who are siblings (brothers and sisters) in God’s family, the church; also verses 16, 19

And in our faith walk, may we look to Christ, as a perfect example for us to follow in order to receive hope,  endurance and encouragement, to preach the gospel of Christ and glorify all that God provides:

Romans 15:1-7 (ESV) The Example of Christ

BLCF: Jesus-example

15 We who are strong have an obligation to bear with the failings of the weak, and not to please ourselves. Let each of us please his neighbor for his good, to build him up. For Christ did not please himself, but as it is written, “The reproaches of those who reproached you fell on me.” For whatever was written in former days was written for our instruction, that through endurance and through the encouragement of the Scriptures we might have hope. May the God of endurance and encouragement grant you to live in such harmony with one another, in accord with Christ Jesus, that together you may with one voice glorify the God and Father of our Lord Jesus Christ. Therefore welcome one another as Christ has welcomed you, for the glory of God.

BLCF Christ_among_people_e_wang

Let us pray…

Closing Hymn #225: Standing on the Promises

Benediction – (Romans 15:4): For whatever was written in former days was written for our instruction, that through endurance and through the encouragement of the Scriptures we might have hope.

BLCF: HOPE